The Girl With Chest Pain

By Sarah Riley-Burnett, DO Her eyes were crazed and glassy when she finally opened them. She had been writhing in the gurney, gyrating her jaw with clinched teeth and breathing heavily.  When she answered questions, all her movement would stop, and she would respond in a clipped staccato formal way as though she were a … Continue reading The Girl With Chest Pain

Providing Trust AND Truth in Family Medicine

By Bob Chestnut, MD “…we are living in this strange time where trust is more important than truth.” Comedian Hasan Minhaj at the 2017 White House correspondents' dinner Most medical school graduates would likely agree that their education was mainly focused on developing medical knowledge. For the purpose of this blog post, I am referring … Continue reading Providing Trust AND Truth in Family Medicine

Ready or Not: Learn to Fly on the Way Down

Expressed political views are those of the author.   As I near the end of my Family Medicine Residency Training and begin to transition into practicing as a Family Physician in real life, I can’t help but believe that I’m ready. Not because I have reached a point where I know every diagnosis and how … Continue reading Ready or Not: Learn to Fly on the Way Down

Can we code more consistently by using our pool?

  As a residency curriculum committee we periodically review anonymous feedback from our residents about their learning experience. This is an invaluable process that brings important perspective to those of us who can lead improvements.  In many cases, the improvements benefit not just residents, but faculty and patients too.  An example that recently highlighted this … Continue reading Can we code more consistently by using our pool?

Medication Reconciliation: It’s Not Just a List

By Karen Gunning and Katie Traylor   Across America, clinics are humming with the sounds of automated blood pressure cuffs, the beep of thermometers, and the clink of the scales. A commonly heard phrase in these clinics during the patient rooming process is: “What medications are you taking?” These five words comprise one of the … Continue reading Medication Reconciliation: It’s Not Just a List

Lessons from Global Health

By Richard Backman, MD I had the opportunity and pleasure to take Physician Assistants and Medical students to Kathmandu, Nepal for an International Health elective in April 2017. Let me preface this with I don’t speak Nepalese, I am not Nepalese and I am not an expert on Global Healthcare. We spent time in a … Continue reading Lessons from Global Health