Nature vs Nurture: What matters more for student interest in Family Medicine?

At a recent conference for medical educators by the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine, Wanda Filer, a past president of the American Academy of Family Physicians asked how many of us in the room had been told we were “too smart for Family Medicine”? At a conference of close to 600 people, a little … Continue reading Nature vs Nurture: What matters more for student interest in Family Medicine?

One in Five

By Vanessa Galli, MD Nearly one in five women have reported experiencing rape in their lifetime according to the most recent data from the CDC. Statistics never mean as much to the reader as an “n of one” or a personal testimony. I myself am the one in five, a survivor of rape. That is … Continue reading One in Five

Choosing Gratitude

By Kara Frame, MD I don’t remember the exact lecture or rotation, but somewhere along the course of my medical school education, I was taught this powerful lesson: a person is capable of changing how she thinks.  Of course, people have natural tendencies- leaning more positive or tending toward a more pessimistic outlook- but to … Continue reading Choosing Gratitude

Just Do It

By Brian Hill, MD I have a big interest in Sports Medicine, and I was recently chatting with someone who is involved in the field.  We had a brief discussion on the topic of doping in athletics.  This is an intriguing but unfortunate topic.  It has been a part of sports for years and is … Continue reading Just Do It

Ten Digital Health Tensions Driving Innovation in Healthcare

By Dr. Christopher Wasden The biggest failure in healthcare is that no one has ever considered the consumer (aka the patient) the customer. Consequently, all stakeholders such as governments, private payers, medtech and pharma companies, and providers almost always ignore consumer-oriented value propositions, and instead focus on creating and delivering their value propositions to one … Continue reading Ten Digital Health Tensions Driving Innovation in Healthcare

Primary care and the opioid epidemic

By Kirsten Stoesser, MD We know now that Prince died from an overdose of opioid pain medication. From pills prescribed to him by a physician for the treatment of chronic pain.  His death wasn’t an isolated incident. “I was dreamin' when I wrote this So sue me if I go 2 fast  But life is … Continue reading Primary care and the opioid epidemic